Friday, March 16, 2012

Asymmetric Wedge Toe

The standard "wedge" toe doesn't fit me too well. My big toe points straight out, so a toe like this tends to pull my sock over.


[standard "wedge" toe]

Not everyone's foot is like this. My DH's foot resembles one of those Dr. Suess characters, so a wedge toe fits him perfectly.

I prefer an asymmetric wedge toe. Using one of these, though, makes your socks "footed", so you can't wear them on the other foot. So they will wear faster.
[shape of an asymmetric wedge toe.]

[asymmetric wedge toe in action]

These toes are easy to do. Here's how:

Toe up:
1. cast on as many sts as you usually do.
2. initially, start increasing every row by KFB'ing on both sides of the sock (increasing 4 sts every row). Do this for about 1cm (1/2 inch).
3. now stop increasing on one side of the sock altogether (the "big toe" side), and continue KFB'ing every other row on the other ("little toe") side only, until you have the right number of sts for the sock body. Keep your wits about you if you are doing two-at-a-time, you don't want to end up with two left socks!!

Cuff down:
1. start your decreases at the usual time (I like to start when the sock is just at the bottom of my little toenail).
2. Decrease (K2tog/ssk) every other row on the little toe side only, until the sock is about 1cm (1/2 inch) shy of the total length. For me this is at the bottom of my big toenail. Again, be vigilant that you are not creating two of the same foot!!
3. Now start decreasing on both sides of the sock, decreasing faster - 4 sts every row.  Do this until you think your sock is long enough - for another 1cm  or 1/2 inch. Usually you wind up with about a dozen sts in total on your needles. Kitchener together.

Easy, eh?

1 comment:

  1. Thank you so much for these! I have refused to knit socks after my first pair (wedge toe) bunched up in one spot and pulled too tight in another. I am looking forward to casting on a new set this weekend!

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